Cmpt 214 Lab 9 Subversion and LINUX/UNIX pipes solution

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Solve or complete each of the tasks or problems below. For all problems involving the use of UNIX/LINUX
commands, place the command or pipeline you used along with the resulting output (i.e. copy-and-paste
from your terminal window) in a file called lab9.txt. However, do not include extraneous or superfluous
commands or output; only include content relevant and essential to the specified task. Then, with a text
editor, add to lab9.txt identifying information to clearly distinguish which commands/output/description
correspond to each task/question. When done, hand in lab9.txt through the moodle page for the lab. This
lab is out of a total of 18 marks, with the marks for each question as indicated. Marks may be docked for
extraneous, irrelevant, or superfluous content or for not following directions. Your submission is due at 11:55
p.m. on Thursday, November 17.
You may use either the local ismac machine (Apple Macintosh in S311 or S315), or you can use tuxworld for
completing this laboratory exercise. Identify which architecture you used at the beginning of lab9.txt for
the benefit of the marker.
1. (3 marks) Construction a UNIX pipeline to produce, on the standard output, the first 20 prime
numbers between 30000000 and 31000000 inclusively, one per line. The pipeline must involve the
factor program you downloaded and built in last week’s lab. The other components of the pipeline
must be standard UNIX/LINUX commands. The pipeline should be as concise as possible. Remember
that documentation on operation of factor is available at http://www.acme.com/software/factor/.
2. (1 mark for each step) In this question, you will practise using svn for version control. Place a log of all
the commands used in this question, as well as the resulting output, in lab9.txt. Each student has a
personal repository at https://svn.cs.usask.ca/svn/student/214/nsid where nsid is their NSID. Locate
your “working copy” directory under your home directory.
As shown in class, one can make use of shell variables to reduce the amount of information that has
to be typed in commands to svn. Also note that if you do not wish to provide the log message via
a -m option to svn commands that want such a message, make sure to have the EDITOR environment
variable defined to be a reasonable value before issuing the command.
Perform the following actions or tasks in the order specified.
(a) Use the “svn info” command to get information about your repository.
(b) Create a subdirectory in your repository for a new project called Lab09. Then within that new
project directory, create subdirectories called trunk, branches, and tags. Make sure to provide
informative log messages for each directory creation in the repository.
(c) Using the “svn list -R” command, get a listing of all the (files and) directories in your repository
within the Lab09 project. If you wish you can use – -recursive rather than -R.
(d) Create a directory for your working copy of the software in the Lab09 software. Then change your
current working directory to this new directory. Finally, using the “svn checkout” command,
check out the current version of the trunk of the Lab09 project. That is, you will want to check
out Lab09/trunk from your repository. Note that currently that trunk is empty.
(e) The previous command should have created a subdirectory called trunk in your current working
directory. Change your current working directory to this subdirectory. Perform an ls command
to demonstrate that the directory is, in fact, empty. Finally, using the echo command, create a
file named file1.txt that contains the string “This is file 1”.
(f) Perform an “svn add” command to inform svn that you intend to add file1.txt to the software
in the repository. Then use ls and “svn list” commands to show that file1.txt is in the
working copy directory but hasn’t actually been copied into the repository.
(g) Using the “svn commit” command cause file1.txt to be “pushed” to the repository. Make
sure to supply an informative log message to the commit operation. Then using an “svn list”
command show that file1.txt is now present in the repository.
(h) Using the “svn status -v” command, show the status of the files in your current working directory. Then, create the file file2.txt using echo. Have the content of the file be the single line
“This is file 2”.
(i) Perform another “svn status -v” command. In your lab9.txt file comment on the meaning of
the difference in status output at this step versus the previous step. What is the status output
telling you? Place your answer in lab9.txt.
(j) Perform an “svn add” command to inform svn that you intend to add file2.txt to the software
in the repository. Then perform another “svn status -v” command. Finally, comment on the
meaning of the difference in status output at this step versus the previous step. What is the
status output indicating to you? Place your answer in lab9.txt.
(k) Using the “svn commit” command cause file2.txt to be “pushed” to the repository. Make
sure to provide an informative log message. Then perform another “svn status -v” command.
Finally, comment on the meaning of the difference in status output at this step versus the previous
step. Place your comment in lab9.txt.
(l) With the echo command add the sentence “This is the second line of file 1” to the end of
file1.txt. Then perform another “svn status -v” command. Finally, comment on the meaning of the difference in status output at this step versus the previous step. Place your comment
in lab9.txt.
(m) At this point the changes to file1.txt need to be committed to the repository. However, before
doing this, it is good practice to do an “svn update” command first to make sure any changes
to the repository are propagated to the working copy. Do this by invoking a “svn update”
command. Finally commit the changes to file1.txt to the repository. Again make sure to
provide a meaningful log message.
(n) Using “svn log” get a verbose log of the evolution of the content of the file file1.txt in the
repository. Part of the mark for this question will be based on the informativeness and appropriateness of messages stored in the log.
(o) Peform a second “svn log” to again get a verbose log, but this time obtain it for the entire trunk
of the Lab09 project in the repository. Again part of the mark for this question will be based on
the informativeness and appropriateness of messages stored in the log.
End of the lab.
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