CSCI 1133 Lab 6 – Small Int solution

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This assignment asks you to write a Java class called SmallInt (similar to a wrapper class). It also asks you to create a
testing class called TestSmallInt. You will need to turn in both for your submission.
EDIT: SEE BELOW FOR OPTIONAL EXTRA CREDIT
Design and Implementation
SmallInt contains the following:
• A private instance variable of type int named value, which is the value of an integer stored by the class constructor.
• A public static constant named MAXVALUE. MAXVALUE should be used as an upper limit for the values SmallInt
can represent. You should set MAXVALUE to 1000. However, keep in mind, the grader may change the value of
MAXVALUE when testing your program.
• A constructor that assigns an integer between 0 and MAXVALUE (inclusive) to value. That’s all the constructor has to
do, using the int parameter that is passed to it. However, the constructor must check to make sure the parameter
value is between 0 and MAXVALUE. If it is not, it should print an informative error message and store the
number 0 instead. (hint: using a method to check the value would be a good idea, because you might need to do a
similar check elsewhere!)
• An instance getter method getDec (returns a String, no parameters) which will return a String representation of the
decimal integer. The easiest way to create this String is to concatenate the int representation to an empty String.
• An instance setter method setDec (returns void, accepts one int parameter) which assigns an integer between 0 and
MAXVALUE to value. However, this setter must check to make sure the parameter value is between 0 and
MAXVALUE. If it is not, it should print an informative error message and store the number 0 instead.
• An instance getter method getBin (returns a String, takes no parameters) should take the number stored in the instance
variable value, generate the corresponding binary string and return that string. This method bears a little more
explanation, since it is one of the more substantial parts of the assignment. The generation of the “corresponding
binary string” is something that you must accomplish yourself, without using any convenient methods or classes
provided by Java’s main library or any external libraries written in Java. If you happen to be familiar with bit
shifting, that approach is OK but you must be sure that you can explain it in your own words (see the directions
about comments later).
There is a nice algorithm for determining the binary representation of an integer. Let’s remember that all integers
can be expressed as powers of two:
7 = 2^0 + 2^1 + 2^2 = 1 + 2 + 4 = 7 —> 111
83 = 2^0 + 2^1 + 2^4 + 2^6 = 1 + 2 + 16 + 64 = 83 —> 1010011
But how will we know which powers of two to use? You can figure this out manually by seeing how many times
you can divide by two (i.e., repeated division). It’s simple and a little naive, but it works. The implementation of
this algorithm is left to you. It is highly recommended that you work out a few examples on paper before you
begin to code. As a hint, remember what pieces of information mod can give you and integer division can give
you. Also, note that there are zeroes in particular places. Where? In the places where the powers of 2 are not used.
We could re-write the expression of 83 in the following way (the new parts have been highlighted for you):
2^0 * 1 + 2^1 * 1 + 2^2 * 0 + 2^3 * 0 + 2^4 * 1 + 2^5 * 0 + 2^6 * 1
Note that the expression above can be simplified into the one presented before. Still, it is important to see the full
sequence since it tells us how to create the binary sequence for 83. Read the 0’s and 1’s from left to right to see
how. In your code, you will be expected to have a block of comments explaining how your algorithm works and
why it’s correct. You should provide a specific example of a number (try not to choose any of the numbers above
or any number that your classmates might have mentioned).
• An instance getter method getHex (returns a String, takes no parameters) should take the number stored in the instance
variable value, generate the corresponding hexadecimal string and return that string. Just like with getBin, your
implementation must consist of only your work.
Hexadecimal expresses values in terms of different powers of a number, which in this case is 16:
7 = 16^0 * 7 = 1 * 7 = 7 —> 0x7
83 = 16^0 * 3 + 16^1 * 5 = 83 —> 0x53
Here we want to note the values of the constants next to the powers of 16, since those constants give us the correct
hex values: 7 and 53, respectively.

We can use the same algorithm from before (i.e., repeated division with % and /) but choose 16 as the divisor this
time. The process should be exactly the same, except now you have to deal with remainder values that will not
just be 0 and 1. The values will range from 0-15, but note that this corresponds to the range of hex characters (0-9,
A-F, 16 in total).
If the remainder is less than 10, you can concatenate the remainder as it is to your hexadecimal string. But if the
remainder is more than 10, you need to convert the value to the corresponding hexadecimal symbol (A-F). You
could create a mapping of values 10-15 to A-F, but there’s a handy type cast that you might find even easier:
hexString = (char) (‘A’ + remainder – 10) + hexString;
//where hexString is the string to be returned by the method
As with getBin(), you will need to provide comments with an explanation of how your algorithm works with a
specific example.
• Finally, you need to write a second public class (that means you will need two .java files) called TestSmallInt.
TestSmallInt will have just one main() method. It will prompt the user (using Scanner) for a number in the range 0
– MAXVALUE (inclusive). You should get MAXVALUE from the SmallInt class. Remember that you can
access this variable from the class itself since it is static (e.g., SmallInt.MAXVALUE).
Then the main() method will simply instantiate a SmallInt object using SmallInt’s constructor and print the
decimal representation, the binary representation and the hexadecimal representation of the number entered by the
user. There is no need to loop until the user decides to quit.
****EXTRA CREDIT****
The following is an OPTIONAL addition to the assignment. You will not lost points if you do not implement this
method. At most, you can earn two (2) additional points by completing the following:
• A static method sameValue (returns a boolean, accepts two String parameters) should take a binary representation of an
int and a hexadecimal representation of an int, convert the bin to hex OR convert the hex to bin, then compare the
Strings to see if they are equal. The result of this comparison is returned. Some examples are provided below.
sameValue (“101”, “5”) would return true
sameValue (“101”, “6”) would return false
sameValue (“1101”, “D”) would return true
sameValue (“1101”, “5”) would return false
sameValue (“11010101”, “D5”) would return true
sameValue (“1011101”, “5D”) would return true
Note: In the first two and the last example you can add leading zeros to the binary String if it makes it easier for
you.
You must use the String equals( ) method to test string equality ( not == ). As an example:
binAsHex.equals(hex)
hexAsBin.equals(bin)
Grading Rubric
Points Criteria
3 Correctly creates the SmallInt class, such that SmallInt objects can be instantiated and
methods can be called on those objects successfully
3 Implements getBin() correctly, with an adequate explanation of how it works
3 Implements getHex() correctly, with an adequate explanation of how it works
1 Good style
(2) Implements sameValue() correctly [ NOT REQUIRED ]