CMPT 145 Assignment 10 Binary Search Trees, and Human Coding solution

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Question 1 (21 points):
Purpose: To adapt some working code to a slightly modied purpose.
Degree of Diculty: Moderate
In class we discussed binary search trees, and basic operations on them. The code for these operations
can be found in the le bstprim.py on the Assignment 10 Moodle page. To get you to study the code, and
to understand what it is doing, we have introduced a few bugs into the code. The bugs are not devious,
but are errors that you should be able to x by understanding the code.
As we also discussed in class, the KVTreeNode class is variant of the treenode class. The key-value treenode
allows us to organize the data according to a key, and store a data value associated with it. You can nd
the implementation in le KVTreeNode.py.
Make a copy of bstprim.py, and call it a10q1.py. Adapt the functions from bstprim.py to use the KVTreeNode
class. The KVTreeNodes in the tree should have the binary search tree property on the keys, but not the values. The functions you need to adapt are as follows:
member_prim(t, k) Returns the tuple True, v, if the key k appears in the tree, with associated value v. If
the key k does not appear in the tree, return the tuple False, None.
insert_prim(t, k, v) Stores the value v with the key k in the Table t.
• If the key k is already in the tree, the value v replaces the value currently associated with it. In this
case, it returns the tuple (False, t) even though t did not change structure in this case.
• If the key is not already in the tree, the key and value are added to the tree. In this case the function
returns the tuple (True, t2). Here, t2 is the same tree as t, but with the new key, value added to
it.
delete_prim(t,k) If the key k is in the tree t, delete the node containing k (and its value) from the tree and
return the pair (True, t2) where t2 is the tree after deleting the key-value pair; return the pair (False,
t) if the key k is not in the given tree t (t is unchanged).
List of les on Moodle for this question
• a10q1.py — partially completed
• bstprim.py — the BST operations, using TreeNode.
• TreeNode — The simpler BST treenode class. Used by bstprim.py; provided in case you want to use
bstprim.
• KVTreeNode — The key-value BST treenode class. For use with a10q1.py. It’s already in nal form.
• test_a10q1.py — A script that will help you check your progress on a10q1.py.
Testing
A test script test_a10q1.py is available on the Assignment 10 Moodle page for your use to check your
progress.
What to Hand In
Your implementation of the primitive BST functions adapted to use KVTreeNodes, in a le named a10q1.py.
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, course number and laboratory section at the top of
all documents.
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Department of Computer Science
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Telephine: (306) 966-4886, Facimile: (306) 966-4884
CMPT 145
Summer-Spring 2019
Principles of Computer Science
Evaluation
• 7 marks: member_prim is correctly adapted.
• 7 marks: insert_prim is correctly adapted.
• 7 marks: delete_prim is correctly adapted.
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CMPT 145
Principles of Computer Science
Question 2 (11 points):
Purpose: To implement the Table ADT, as described in class.
Degree of Diculty: Should be Easy
In this question, you’ll implement the full Table class, as we discussed in class. The Table class has the
following methods:
size() Returns the number of key-value pairs in the Table.
is_empty() Returns True if the Table t is empty, False otherwise.
insert(k,v) Stores the value v with the key k in the Table. If the key k is already in the Table, the value v
replaces any value already stored for that key.
retrieve(k) If the key k is in the Table, return a tuple True, value, where value is the value stored with the
given key; otherwise return the tuple False, None.
delete(k) If the key k is in the Table, delete the key-value pair from the table and return True; return False
if the key k is not in the Table.
A starter le has been provided for you, which you can nd on Moodle named a10q2.py. The __init__
method is already implemented for you, and all of the others have an interface and a trivial do-nothing
denition. In addition, we’ve provided a scoring script for you to check your progress.
To complete this question, you may use import a10q1 to import your solution to Question 1 into the Table
ADT. Your Table methods can call the primitive BST functions. Your Table methods may have to do a few
house-keeping items (such as change the size attribute when inserting or deleting), but most of the work
is done by your solution to Question 1.
List of les on Moodle for this question
• a10q2.py — partially completed
• test_a10q2.py — A script that will help you check your progress on a10q2.py.
What to Hand In
Your implementation of the Table ADT in a le named a10q2.py.
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, course number and laboratory section at the top of
all documents.
Evaluation
• 1 mark: size: Your implementation correctly returns the number of key-value pairs stored in the table.
• 1 mark: is_empty: Your implementation correctly returns the number of key-value pairs stored in the
table.
• 3 marks: retrieve: Your implementation correctly searches for a key in the table, and returns the
value if found.
• 3 marks: insert: Your implementation correctly adds a key-value pair to the table.
• 3 marks: delete: Your implementation correctly removes a key-value pair from the table.
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Question 3 (15 points):
THIS IS A BONUS QUESTION! It means that you can get over 100% in this assignment.
Purpose: To practice the skill of reading and modifying someone else’s code. To recognize that eciency
of memory use is sometimes as important as computational eciency.
Degree of Diculty: Moderate
On the Assignment 10 Moodle page, you’ll nd the program Decoder.py. It is a fully functional program
that is able to decode les based on a expected le format.
The program follows a simple design, and is well-documented. It contains 4 functions, as follows:
main() : The main program.
1. Reads the entire le.
2. Extracts the code.
3. Extracts the encoded message
4. Builds the codec
5. Decodes the message.
build_decoder(code_lines) Build the dictionary for decoding starting with the given list of code-lines.
decode_message(coded_message, codec) : Decode the message using the decoder.
read_le(fname) : Reads every line in the named le, putting all the lines into a single list.
However, there is a serious eciency problem with this program. The design requires that the entire le
be read at once, and that all the data get passed from one function to another. For example, the function
read_file() reads the entire le’s contents, and stores it all in a single list of strings. From there, the lines
of encoded text are decoded one at a time, but all the encoded text is stored in a list.
For small les, this is okay, since modern computers are fairly big. However, for very large les, bigger than
what we’re working with, it is very inecient to store the whole le’s worth of data in memory all at once. It
is better, when it is possible, avoid this situation.
Your job is to take the given code, and rewrite parts of it, so that the program does not store all the data in
the le all at once. This task will require some study of the current code, and some redesign. You do not
need to write new algorithms. You just need to arrange it so that the program is not storing all le’s data at
the same time.
For this question, Version Control may be especially useful, as you will want to save your program at various
stages of development while you rewrite it. Whether you actually use the history of your development or
not, ensuring that you could is a professional attitude.
A small collection of example les are also provided to you to test your program. Phoenix has included
some his thoughts that have been encoded.
What to Hand In
• A le named a10q3.py containing the revised program.
• A le named a10q3-mystery.txt containing the decoded output from the example les (encoded-story1.txt,
encoded-story2.txt and encoded-story3.txt).
Be sure to include your name, NSID, student number, course number and laboratory section at the top of
all documents.
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Principles of Computer Science
Evaluation
• 8 marks: Your program correctly decodes encoded les, and does not store the entire contents of the
encoded le in memory at the same time.
• 5 marks: Your program is well-designed, documented, and shows evidence of defensive programming.
• 2 marks: Phoenix’s thoughts in a10q3-mystery.txt.
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